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The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2017 seeks to make numerous changes to existing Department of Defense security assistance policy and authorities. This infographic attempts to show you the important differences between the House, Senate, and Conference versions. Portions of the NDAA seek to improve accountability and transparency by requiring more detailed annual reports on security assistance initiatives. The Senate version of the NDAA, in particular, attempts to streamline security assistance authorities by combining several existing authorities into one "Counter Islamic State in Iraq and Levant Fund," and enacting a new chapter of U.S. Code to address Department of Defense security assistance programs.

Infographic showing what U.S. cybersecurity assistance has looked like over the past two fiscal years.

On November 25, 2015, the President signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2016 (S. 1356) to authorize Defense Department programs and policies for next year. While renewing many previously created military aid funding authorities, this law authorizes four new military aid authorities or programs (see the asterisk for these authorities) worth a total $478 million. The legislation creates or extends several new military aid restrictions, policy statements, and reports. The new law also includes $5 billion in budgetary cuts after the President vetoed an earlier version of the bill submitted to him by Congress in October. The following table shows the key differences between this new law and earlier House and Senate passed bills.

A walk through U.S. aid for Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) from 2012-2016.

U.S. Security Assistance to Central Asia: A Post-Afghanistan Shift in Strategy

Introduction

Since the U.S. military announced its withdrawal from Afghanistan, the United States is focusing less on providing military and police aid to Central Asian security forces. In FY 2014, the State Department allocated $33.3 million in security...

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