PL 480 `Food for Peace`

PL 480 `Food for Peace` At A Glance

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The Food for Peace (FFP) provides U.S. food assistance to meet emergency food needs around the world, and funds development-oriented programs to help address the underlying causes of food insecurity.

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The Food for Peace (FFP) program authorizes the provision of U.S. food assistance to meet emergency food needs around the world, and funds development-oriented programs to help address the underlying causes of food insecurity. Signed into law as the Agricultural Trade Development Act by President Eisenhower in July 1954, FFP was established at a time when the United States had a surplus of government food stocks to send to countries that faced dire food shortages. It is no longer a program based on surplus food supplies, but rather delivers emergency or non-emergency food aid based on set criteria. Various portions of the FFP were historically administered by different U.S. agencies; Title II, the largest of FFP programs, funding is appropriated to the Agriculture Department and is administered by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Titles I and III of the FFP are no longer funded, and Title IV remains small. Congress appropriates funding for the program each year as part of the regular federal budget process, and its authorization typically comes in annual farm bills. In its FY 2014 budget request, the Obama administration proposed drastic changes to the FFP, dividing its funding among three USAID assistance accounts while arguing that the proposed shifts will increase flexibility, timeliness, and efficiency in the provision of emergency food aid.

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