Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program

Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program At A Glance

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Funded through the Defense Department, the Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) provides funding for "foreign military officers to attend U.S. military educational institutions and selected regional centers for non-lethal training.”

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In January 2002, Congress appropriated $17.9 million in the 2002 Defense Appropriations bill to allow the Pentagon to launch a Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP). The new program, the law specified, would “fund foreign military officers to attend U.S. military educational institutions and selected regional centers for non-lethal training.” Begun at the urging of the regional military commands, the CTFP has become one of the most significant sources of training funds worldwide used to train military, ministry of defense official, security official at education institutions, and coast guard. In 2003 the CTFP became a permanent program, when Congress included it in the 2004 National Defense Authorization Act. A new section of the U.S. Code (Title 10, section 2249c) gave the Secretary of Defense the authority to spend up to $20 million each year on the program, using the military's 'defense-wide' operations and maintenance budget. When the CTFP began, it was intended to be a largely academic program, somewhat similar to the Regional Centers for Security Studies. A 2003 Defense Department policy guidance explained, however, that “all non-lethal education and training is to be considered available through the CT fellowship.” The 2004 authorization expanded the CTFP to allow lethal training, and permitted it to fund training activities that carry out training in other countries, outside U.S. defense educational institutions. The NDAA for FY2017 transferred the authority to the new Chapter 16 in U.S. Code.

Program Data

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