Commander's Emergency Response Program

Commander's Emergency Response Program At A Glance

Humanitarian & Development Aid $5,000,000 (2016)
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The Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP) was established by the Iraqi Coalition Provisional Authority in 2003 to enable military commanders to respond to urgent humanitarian relief requirements in Iraq. 

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The Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP) was established by the Iraqi Coalition Provisional Authority in 2003 to enable military commanders to respond to urgent humanitarian relief requirements in Iraq. CERP projects were intended to address urgent, small-scale, humanitarian relief, reconstruction projects and services that immediately assisted the indigenous population and that the local population or government could sustain. The Defense Department (DOD) defines urgent as any chronic or acute inadequacy of an essential good or service that in the judgment of the local commander calls for immediate action. With resources drawn from the Overseas Contingency Operations account, DOD is responsible for establishing, overseeing and supervising the execution of CERP policies and procedures, and the DOD Undersecretary is responsible for relaying CERP activities timely to congressional defense committees through quarterly reports. Funds for CERP were initially drawn from seized assets after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, but later formalized under the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005, which extended the authority to U.S. forces in Afghanistan. The authority was reauthorized by Congress each subsequent year, though beginning with the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2012, Iraq was no longer eligible for funding, reflecting U.S. withdrawal from the country. Congress eventually grew concerned that resources were being used for long-term infrastructure projects, thus placing a limit of $20 million on CERP projects to ensure appropriate use.   

Military vs. Economic Aid

Security Assistance Monitor tracks all available data about U.S. security and humanitarian & development assistance provided to this country. For a dollar amount breakdown of how much aid this country receives and which programs are supplying assistance, click "view data set." Note: This year's figures reflect the U.S. government's estimates of expected spending, and numbers for next year represent the administration's request to Congress.
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Trainees

Security Assistance Monitor tracks all available data about the United States' training of this country's security forces. For information about how the number of security forces trained each year by the United States, including detailed information about the subject of the training, where that training takes place, and who is being trained, click "view data set."
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Arms Sales

Security Assistance Monitor tracks all available data about U.S. arms sales to this country. For detailed information on equipment, weapons and military services sold to this country, click "view data set." Note: This is not grant aid: these are items that governments purchase with their own funds.
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Analysis

1/27/15 | Fact Sheets
New Defense Department Programs in the National Defense Authorization Act FY2015

The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 includes many provisions that affect the way the U.S. military engages in foreign military and police aid, training and arms sales worldwide. Based on an initial review of the bill (H.R. 3979), it would create at least seven...

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12/5/14 | Blog
House Agrees to Seven New DoD Foreign Security Assistance Programs

Yesterday, the House of Representatives approved the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015. The bill is identical to the recently...

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Resources

1/5/15 | News
Legitimate Deliberate Democracy in Transition: Failure in the Democratization of Iraq by the United States from 2003-2014
In order for the democracy in Iraq to succeed post-US occupation, the Iraqi government must be inclusive of all interest groups in Iraq, specifically the ethno-sectarian groups that represent the Shia, Sunni Arab, and Sunni Kurdish populations in Iraq.
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