Prosperous and Secure Neighbor Alliance Act of 2007

Bill Number: 
H.R.502
Bill Location: 
Date of Last Action: 
Wednesday, January 17, 2007
Relevant Text: 

HR 502 IH

110th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 502

To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize assistance to improve security and promote economic development in Mexico.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 17, 2007

Mr. CUELLAR (for himself and Mr. REYES) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs

A BILL

To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize assistance to improve security and promote economic development in Mexico.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `Prosperous and Secure Neighbor Alliance Act of 2007'.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS; STATEMENT OF POLICY.

    (a) Findings- Congress finds the following:

      (1) An alarming increase in illicit drugs and drug-related violence in Mexico and on the United States-Mexico border has made life gradually more difficult for Americans living in border communities.

      (2) The precarious security situation on the United States-Mexico border has also had a broader negative impact in the United States with illicit drugs continuing to get into the hands of our Nation's children.

      (3) United States Director of National Intelligence John Negroponte named Mexico in the Annual Threat Assessment of the Director of National Intelligence for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (February 2, 2006) as a country of concern regarding the capacity of drug trafficking organizations to undermine already weak state authority.

      (4) As a neighbor and as the second largest trading partner of the United States, Mexico deserves the support of the United States in taking steps to improve security and promote economic development in Mexico.

    (b) Statement of Policy- It is, therefore, the policy of the United States to increase United States foreign assistance to improve security and promote economic development in Mexico, both of which are crucial to more effectively combat illicit drugs and drug-related violence and other criminal activities in Mexico and the United States.

SEC. 3. AMENDMENT TO THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961.

    Part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq) is amended by adding at the end the following:

`CHAPTER 13--ASSISTANCE TO IMPROVE SECURITY AND PROMOTE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN MEXICO

`SEC. 499H. AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE.

    `(a) In General- The President, acting through the Director of Foreign Assistance, shall provide assistance to improve security and promote economic development in Mexico by--

      `(1) professionalizing Mexican law enforcement personnel to prepare such law enforcement personnel to more effectively combat illicit drugs and drug-related violence and other criminal activities, including by providing funding to coordinate United States and Mexican efforts to find missing United States citizens and to carry out DNA testing and forensic examinations;

      `(2) providing technology to assist Mexican law enforcement personnel to more effectively combat illicit drugs and drug-related violence;

      `(3) strengthening the Mexican judicial branch through the training of judges and prosecutors;

      `(4) supporting anti-corruption programs in Mexico, including the vetting of Mexican law enforcement personnel who are working with United States Government personnel; and

      `(5) reducing poverty through targeted funding to enhance social development in Mexico, including micro-lending and trade capacity building.

    `(b) Terms and Conditions- Assistance under this chapter may be provided on such terms and conditions as the President may determine.

`SEC. 499I. EVALUATION.

    `The President shall conduct an annual evaluation of the results of the specific programs, projects, and activities carried out under this chapter during the preceding year in order to ensure transparency and accountability, including transparency and accountability of recipients of assistance provided under this chapter.

`SEC. 499J. REPORT.

    `The President shall prepare and transmit to the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and other appropriate congressional committees an annual report on the specific programs, projects, and activities carried out under this chapter during the preceding year, including the evaluation conducted under section 499I.

`SEC. 499K. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    `(a) In General- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out this chapter $170,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2008 through 2012.

    `(b) Additional Authorities- Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations under subsection (a)--

      `(1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      `(2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.

    `(c) Funding Limitation- Not more than 5 percent of the amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations under subsection (a) for a fiscal year may be used for administrative expenses.

    `(d) Sense of Congress- It is the sense of Congress that, of the amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations under subsection (a) for a fiscal year--

      `(1) $40,000,000 should be made available to carry out section 499H(a)(1);

      `(2) $50,000,000 should be made available to carry out section 499H(a)(2);

      `(3) $20,000,000 should be made available to carry out section 499H(a)(3);

      `(4) $10,000,000 should be made available to carry out section 499H(a)(4); and

      `(5) $50,000,000 should be made available to carry out section 499H(a)(5).'.

SEC. 4. REPORT BY GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to Congress a report that contains a description and analysis of the most effective strategies to reduce the demand for illicit drugs in the United States, specifically (but not limited to) strategies that reduce the demand for illicit drugs produced in or transported through Mexico.