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The United States has encountered serious challenges in building the capacity of foreign military and security forces to combat terrorist groups from corruption. In countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq, Mali, Nigeria, and Yemen, corruption was at the root of why counterterrorism efforts failed or stalled and why U.S. weapons and training were diverted or not used at all. But, where will the United States faces similar risks in the future, and how can the United States better mitigate these risks? Please join the below speakers to help answers these tough questions.

The number of U.S. foreign military trainees increased substantially from 79,865 trainees in FY 2015 to 128,280 trainees in FY 2016, according to the State Department’s recent U.S. “Foreign Military Training” reports.

Prepared remarks of SAM Director Colby Goodman at the "Global Anti-Corruption: Transparency in the Modern Age" symposium at the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics on October 17, 2017.

U.S. arms sales deliveries jumped to more than $25 billion in FY 2015, increasing the total value of U.S. arms deliveries by at least $5 billion over recent years, according to latest data from several U.S. government reports. 

Since September 11, the U.S. government has overseen a massive expansion in Pentagon-funded aid to foreign security forces, moving from $800 million in FY 2001 to more than $10.8 billion in FY 2015. However, a string of reports and articles over the past year have highlighted serious concerns with these efforts.

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