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Over the past 15 years, the United States has significantly expanded the number of U.S. security sector aid funding accounts or programs to support a range of U.S. national security and foreign policy goals. This guide provides an overview of 29 key, active U.S. programs funded by the Defense or State Departments and grouped by their primary purpose.

The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2017 seeks to make numerous changes to existing Department of Defense security assistance policy and authorities. This infographic attempts to show you the important differences between the House, Senate, and Conference versions. Portions of the NDAA seek to improve accountability and transparency by requiring more detailed annual reports on security assistance initiatives. The Senate version of the NDAA, in particular, attempts to streamline security assistance authorities by combining several existing authorities into one "Counter Islamic State in Iraq and Levant Fund," and enacting a new chapter of U.S. Code to address Department of Defense security assistance programs.

The debate over the recent U.S. offer to sell M1A2 Abrams battle tanks to Saudi Arabia has raised the question of Saudi dependency on U.S. equipment for its defense needs in general and for the prosecution of its war in Yemen in particular. Saudi Arabia has requested up to 153 tanks, 20 of which have been described by the Pentagon as being destined to replenish vehicles damaged in the war in Yemen. The deal also includes related equipment, including machine guns, grenade launchers, night vision devices, and ammunition.

The United States and Israel have had a strong security relationship for decades, including billions of dollars in U.S. military aid. Most observers only consider the $3.1 billion in State Department's Foreign Military Financing program though. Often not included in figures on U.S. military aid to Israel is the Defense Department-funded military aid, which has included over $100 million per year since 2002 and peaked in 2014 at $729 million.

Infographic showing what U.S. cybersecurity assistance has looked like over the past two fiscal years.

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