Security Assistance

Friday, November 11, 2016 - 07:36
The Security Assistance Monitor has just published a new guide on the basics of U.S. Military and Police Aid. The guide gives an overview of the different programs, the most prominent program purposes, different types of military and police aid, top recipients, and key program initiation dates.
Friday, November 11, 2016 - 06:57

Over the past 15 years, the United States has significantly expanded the number of U.S. security sector aid funding accounts or programs to support a range of U.S. national security and foreign policy goals. This guide provides an overview of 29 key, active U.S. programs funded by the Defense or State Departments and grouped by their primary purpose.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - 08:59
The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announces sales of $33.6 billion for Fiscal Year 2016. The total sales include $2.9 billion of Foreign Military Financing-funded cases; $5.0 billion in Building Partner Capacity-funded cases; and $25.7 billion funded by partner nations.
Tuesday, November 1, 2016 - 07:22
After 15 years of training and more than $70 billion in support from the U.S., the casualty rate has soared again this year for the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, according to an inspector general's quarterly report to Congress.
Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 07:44
A gunman, reportedly in an Afghan army uniform, shot dead two American advisers and wounded three on Wednesday near a base outside the Afghan capital before being killed himself, officials said.
Monday, September 26, 2016 - 07:39
President Obama will leave office having failed to use the tools at his disposal to make significant progress on getting child soldiers off the battlefield. That’s the consensus among human rights groups who point to the fact that for six consecutive years, the Obama administration has subverted U.S. law requiring the president to sanction foreign governments that force children to fight.
Monday, September 26, 2016 - 06:16

The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2017 seeks to make numerous changes to existing Department of Defense security assistance policy and authorities. This infographic attempts to show you the important differences between the House, Senate, and Conference versions. Portions of the NDAA seek to improve accountability and transparency by requiring more detailed annual reports on security assistance initiatives. The Senate version of the NDAA, in particular, attempts to streamline security assistance authorities by combining several existing authorities into one "Counter Islamic State in Iraq and Levant Fund," and enacting a new chapter of U.S. Code to address Department of Defense security assistance programs.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016 - 08:11
Experts now estimate the Pentagon alone spends $8 billion to $10 billion a year on assistance to more than 180 countries—compared to approximately $8 billion a year by the State Department to 147 countries—which has led many to question the apparent militarization of U.S. security assistance and the impact that has on short- and long-term security and foreign policy objectives.
Friday, August 19, 2016 - 07:08
Things aren’t going so well in Afghanistan these days. The Obama administration plans to reduce America’s presence there by only about half as much as it originally intended, from the current level of 9,800 to 8,400 instead of 5,500 by the end of 2016. The administration also expanded the rules of engagement governing the armed forces’ ability to involve themselves in conflict and will allow U.S. forces to accompany the regular Afghan military into combat situations. These expanding mission sets come at a time when the U.S. military continues to be underfunded, faces a troubling readiness crisis, and must contend with an increasingly dangerous and demanding global operating environment.
Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 06:43
Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan still outnumber U.S. troops by a 3-to-1 margin according to new research released this week, raising questions again about the role those workers play in the ongoing wars overseas and the oversight they receive.

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