Voices from Japan: Visions for Japan’s Future Defense Posture

The Stimson Center’s Japan Program is proud to present the 5th annual Voices from Japan symposium. General Kiyofumi Iwata (JGSDF, ret.), Admiral Tomohisa Takei (JMSDF, ret.), and Lt. Gen. Masayuki Hironaka (JASDF, ret.) will discuss how Japan’s defense posture should evolve in the ever-changing security environment in the Asia-Pacific and beyond. These recently retired JSDF general officers are each visionaries in their services and offer perspectives built on decades of experience with Japan’s security.

 
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Stabilizing Iraq: What Is the Future for Minorities?

To stabilize Iraq following ISIS’ rule, and to prevent new violence that religious extremists can exploit, the broad inclusion of minority groups will be vital. Nowhere in Iraq is that imperative more essential or complex than around Mosul, with its communities of Christians, Yazidis, Turkoman, Shabak, and other groups. ISIS’ atrocities—including genocide and the sexual enslavement of women—destroyed local communities and traumatized victims from all groups. On August 1, join an examination of the work required to protect and include minorities, and the roles that can be played by Iraq’s national government, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and the United States.

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In this article Al-Jazeera speaks to the head of the UN peacekeeping mission about plans to bring security to conflict-hit Central African Republic.
This article discusses the implications of the Trump administrations consultation with private security companies to devise a plan in Afghanistan. A Washington Post article discusses why private military contractors aren’t going to do a better job in Afghanistan.
This article discusses how campaigners lost a high-profile case calling for UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia to be stopped over humanitarian concerns, as the high court ruled exports could continue.
This article discusses the recent decision in the House rejecting Trump’s proposal to cut spending on foreign aid to the Middle East and highlights the strategic importance of continuing aid to Jordan, Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia.
This article by SAM highlights the fallacies surrounding the defense industry and the global arms trade, including the perception that U.S. defense spending is a major jobs creator. The authors also discuss corruption and the revolving door between the lobbying industry and defense contractors.
The Department of Defense has a major gun control problem. On May 26, Amnesty International published a damning report revealing that the United States failed to track more than $1 billion in arms transfers to Iraqi and Kuwaiti security forces as part of Operation Inherent Resolve. The report, based on a now-declassified 2016 DoD audit obtained via Freedom of Information Act requests, shows that terrible record keeping and loose restrictions potentially let weapons from machine guns to mortar rounds fall into the hands of ISIS.
Afghan government officials say they are leery about President Donald Trump’s plan to grant new authority to the Pentagon to set troop levels in the war-torn country, expressing concern that such a shift could be a sign that larger numbers of Americans might soon be headed back to the front lines in the 15-year war.
U.S. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle laid bare their suspicions about U.S. arms sales to Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Lebanon over the countries’ supposed links to terror on Thursday, perhaps signaling choppy waters in the alliances.

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