Resources - Policy Statements

NGOs and Academia

Below are key statements from non-novernmental or academic analyses related to the U.S. defense and security assistance to the rest of the world. 

Date Range
***To filter by region, select a region from the View Site by Region menu at the top of the page
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
We write today to urge more robust engagement by your administration on the Egyptian government’s current efforts to target independent nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and likely shut down organizations that do not register under a highly restrictive 2002 law. By all accounts, this effort may well end most independent civil society work in the country. English
Country(s): 
Egypt
Publisher / Source: 
Video, Audio or PDF?: 
pdf
Tuesday, November 4, 2014
As Lebanon’s parliament debates canceling national elections and extending its own term by more than two years, Freedom House issued the following statement: "Lebanon's legislators should respect the constitution and the right of Lebanon's citizens to have a say in who governs them, and that requires parliamentary elections," said Charles Dunne, director of Middle East and North Africa programs. "Despite security concerns in the country, arbitrarily prolonging the parliament’s term in office does not promote political stability or rule of law. Lebanon’s leaders should hold elections this year as scheduled, as a meaningful step toward ending the country’s political crises." Lebanon is rated Partly Free in Freedom in the World 2014 and Partly Free in Freedom of the Press 2013.
Country(s): 
Lebanon
Publisher / Source: 
Video, Audio or PDF?: 
pdf
Tag(s): 
Tuesday, November 4, 2014
It is becoming clear that the American-led international coalition and its airstrikes in Iraq and Syria alone are not going to defeat ISIS. The U.S. government, its Western allies, and its Middle East partners, thus far, are against deploying ground troops to Iraq. The New Iraqi Army, a Shiite dominated organisation, has shown itself unwilling or incapable of defending Sunni-dominated western provinces. None of the parties concerned will commit soldiers to face ISIS, despite their acts of unspeakable violence and depravity. Current U.S. policy is against any military action in Iraq that does not come from the air, including firm support for non-conventional ground forces. The results thus far speak for themselves.English
Country(s): 
Iraq
Syria
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Video, Audio or PDF?: 
pdf
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
What a difference a year makes. In the fall of 2013, Syria dominated the headlines, in part from fear that its spillover would destabilize its neighbors, Iraq first among them. Sadly, those fears proved prophetic. Sparks from Syria, in the form of the Salafi terrorist group calling itself the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), helped reignite the Iraqi civil war. And the implosion of Iraq has pulled the Syrian conflict which triggered it back into the spotlight of America’s foreign policy debate. Yet throughout that year, the notion of increased American involvement, and in particular, ramped up assistance to the Syrian opposition was effectively off the table. The Administration and most of its critics regularly scoffed at the idea. Now, thanks to the crisis in Iraq and the belated recognition that spillover from Syria is an important element of the problems there, what was once ridiculed is now policy. In his speech to the nation in September 2014, President Obama finally pledged to build a moderate Syrian opposition, one capable of taking on both the Asad regime and Sunni extremist groups like ISIS. Weeks later, the Congress passed bills appropriating $500 million for that mission. As of this writing in early fall 2014, the administration’s plans are not completely clear. Nevertheless, from what has become publicly available, it does appear that Washington has adopted the strategy toward Syria presented in this paper. Consequently, this study should be seen as an effort to explain in greater detail how such a policy should be implemented, why it makes sense for the United States, and why it is a reasonable (perhaps even necessary) move by the U.S. government.
Country(s): 
Iraq
Syria
Author(s): 
Video, Audio or PDF?: 
pdf
Monday, September 29, 2014
The arbitrary and excessive use of pretrial detention around the world is a massive form of human rights abuse that affects in excess of 14 million people a year. English
Country(s): 
Global
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Thursday, September 18, 2014
Policymakers in Congress and the Executive Branch are rightfully focused on addressing the threat posed by the Islamic State. The White House maintains that it already possesses the legal authority for armed conflict against the Islamic State under the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for Use of Military Force (AUMF). This view is mistaken, and has received a critical reception from legal experts and members of Congress, some of whom have called for a new AUMF. In the past week, several new authorizations have already been proposed.English
Country(s): 
Iraq
Syria
Publisher / Source: 
Monday, August 25, 2014
The beheading of American journalist James Foley at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (also known as ISIS or ISIL) is a brutal reminder of the group’s threat not just in the Middle East, but also against Americans. To defeat this threat, the United States should expand the range of its airstrike campaign, increase the number of personnel deployed to Iraq, and empower its regional allies to roll-back ISIS’ territorial gains. English
Country(s): 
Iraq
Syria
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Azerbaijan’s arrest of a leading human rights defender and government critic, Rasul Jafarov, reflects the government’s concerted efforts to silence its critics. English
Country(s): 
Azerbaijan
Publisher / Source: 
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
“Human Rights Vetting: Nigeria and Beyond”English
Country(s): 
Nigeria
Africa Regional
Publisher / Source: 
Wednesday, July 9, 2014
Concerns over weak military professionalism are a common thread woven through assessments of security contexts in Africa. - See more at: http://africacenter.org/?s=professionalism#sthash.87jJt4JT.dpuf
Country(s): 
Africa Regional
Author(s): 
Tag(s): 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
This report analyzes Tunisia’s draft counterterrorism law and assesses to what extent the proposed law conforms to international human rights standards. The draft law was submitted to the National Constituent Assembly, Tunisia’s parliament, by the Council of Ministers in January 2014 and is under review.English
Country(s): 
Tunisia
Publisher / Source: 
Monday, July 7, 2014
A surge in arbitrary arrests, detentions and harrowing incidents of torture and deaths in police custody recorded by Amnesty International provide strong evidence of the sharp deterioration in human rights in Egypt in the year since President Mohamed Morsi was ousted.English
Country(s): 
Egypt
Publisher / Source: 
Tag(s): 
Tuesday, July 1, 2014
Analysis of photographs and satellite imagery strongly indicates that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) conducted mass executions in Tikrit after seizing control of the city on June 11, 2014.
Country(s): 
Iraq
Publisher / Source: 
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
The longer the United States ignores the growing threat of these jihadist groups, the more difficult it will be to roll back, as recent events in Iraq have shown. Yet, addressing it solely through a narrow counterterrorism strategy would exacerbate the problemEnglish
Country(s): 
Iraq
Syria
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Drawing on the results of a 2013 study in six northern Nigerian states, this report addresses the question of how youth are radicalized and recruited into armed groups and what the Nigerian government and other interested actors can do to prevent it.English
Country(s): 
Nigeria
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Wednesday, June 18, 2014
The current crisis in Iraq is a sobering reminder of the vulnerability of the United States to the inherent instability of the global oil market. English
Country(s): 
Iraq
Tag(s): 
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
Although Bahraini security officials argue that Bahraini Shi'ite opposition leaders are under Iran's influence, the Shi'ites reject this notion, claiming that they are seeking to reverse discrimination and obtain social equality with Sunnis.English
Country(s): 
Bahrain
Iran
Author(s): 
Publisher / Source: 
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
After more than a decade of extended U.S. military deployments and costly counterinsurgency efforts, the United States needs to find a new pathway that employs a more targeted use of force in coordination with reliable partners in the region. The United States must use all elements of statecraft to get countries in the region to stop engaging in policies that undermine long-term stability and start taking steps to respond to the crushing social, economic, and demographic trends that are affecting every country in the region.
Country(s): 
Iraq
Publisher / Source: 
Friday, June 13, 2014
Azerbaijan has picked a fight with the U.S. government. The simplest explanation for this may be that President Aliyev is as paranoid and isolated as their actions suggest. If United States want to maintain influence in Azerbaijan it should find messengers who can get through some thick palace walls.English
Country(s): 
Azerbaijan
Author(s): 

Pages